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Making our Department Better

*** NOTE THAT THIS IS A CURRENTLY A  DRAFT ***
If you know of something we could be doing better or differently, we want to hear from you. 
 
 

Suggestions & Comments

Do you have a big transformative idea?  A small pet peeve? A serious concern that should be reported ? A little request? Or has there been a recent change you really like, or that you’d like to see more of? We welcome your suggestions and reports in person, but if you prefer to express your thoughts in writing, drop us an email or use the suggestions and reports form, which enables you to choose recipients and remain anonymous if you want.
 

Reporting an Incident

If you experienced or witnessed an apparent violation of UCSB’s Principles of Community, we encourage you to file a report.
 
The campus-level reporting mechanisms are managed by the Hate/Bias Response Program (for discrimination, microaggressions, bullying, or similar actions that contribute to a hostile climate) and the Title IX Office (for sexual violence and harassment).
 
If you’re not sure where to start, would rather talk to people you know, or feel that the incident you want to report may be best handled within the Department, you can discuss the matter in person or use the Earth Science Department suggestions and reports form (which you can submit completely anonymously) to communicate with department staff or faculty, such as:
  • Department Chair (Prof. Andy Wyss)
  • Vice-Chair & Graduate Advisor (Prof. Susannah Porter)
  • Department Manager (Jaima Ortega)
  • Diversity Advocates (Prof. Robin Matoza and Matt Rioux)
  • Undergraduate Program Coordinator (Shannon Dalton)
  • Graduate Program Coordinator (Yann Ricard)
  • A trusted instructor or your research advisor
Be aware  that UC employees—including faculty, staff, and students when they work as UC employees in any capacity, including Residence Advisors, TAs, and Researchers—are classified as responsible employees required by law to report any incident of sexual violence, sexual harassment or other conduct prohibited by Title IX policy to the Title IX office. Please do not let this deter you from exploring your options or seeking helpIf you prefer discussing a matter with someone who is not required  to report it to the Title IX office, but can offer support and discuss your options, the following groups are available:
 

Hate or Bias Incidents

Hate or bias incidents include discriminatory comments or actions, denigrating jokes or comments, microaggressions, bullying, or any other action motivated in whole or in part by bias based on an individual’s or group’s actual or perceived race, color, creed, religion, national origin, gender, age, marital status, appearance, disability, public assistance status, veteran status or military affiliation, sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression, that creates a hostile or unwelcoming climate.
 

How to report? The campus-level reporting is managed by the UCSB Bias Incident Response Program. If you’re not sure where to start, would rather talk to people you know, or feel that the incident you want to report may be best handled within the Department, you can discuss the matter in person or using the suggestions and reports form (which can provide you with complete anonymity) with department staff or faculty, such as:

  • Department Chair (Prof. Andy Wyss)
  • Vice-Chair & Graduate Advisor (Prof. Susannah Porter)
  • Department Manager (Jaima Ortega)
  • Diversity Advocates (Prof. Robin Matoza and Matt Rioux)
  • Undergraduate Program Coordinator (Shannon Dalton)
  • Graduate Program Coordinator (Yann Ricard)
  • A trusted instructor or your research advisor

Who sees the report? Information submitted in a report may be shared with multiple administrative offices so that UCSB can offer resources, investigate, and respond to the incident. However, the Bias Reporting Program strives to respect the reporting party's wishes for privacy as much as possible, and reports can be submitted anonymously if desired.

 

Do you have any control? Reporting a possible hate crime or bias incident does not "lock" you into a chain of events over which you are powerless. You will have input throughout the process. You will be treated with respect and sensitivity, and your report will be considered private to the extent possible.

 
Many more answers to frequently asked questions about the campus-level reporting and process can be found here
 

Sexual Violence and Sexual Harassment Incidents

Sexual Violence and Sexual Harassment Incidents include sexual violence, harassment, stalking, or discrimination based on gender (including pregnancy or parenting), gender identy, or gender expression, and other topics described in the UC policy on sexual violence and harassment.
 

How to report? The campus-level reporting is managed by the Title IX Office. You can consult with Title IX office staff. In a consultation, you can discuss a situation in a non-specific way and without sharing names. If you are ready to file a formal report, you can use their online reporting page, which can provide you with complete anonymity, if you so desire. 

 
If you’re not sure where to start or would rather talk to people you know, you can discuss the matter in person (or using the suggestions and reports form, which can provide you with complete anonymity) with department staff or faculty. However, be aware that UC employees—including faculty, staff, and students when they work as UC employees in any capacity including Residence Advisors, TAs, and Researchers—are classified as responsible employees required by law to report any incident of sexual violence, sexual harassment or other conduct prohibited by the policy to the Title IX office. But please do not let this deter you from exploring your options or seeking help. If you prefer discussing a matter with someone who is not required  to report it to the Title IX office, but can offer support and discuss your options, the following groups are available:
 
Who sees the report? Our Department and the Title IX Office strive to protect your privacy, but neither can guarantee it. The Title IX Office is an “office of record,” meaning that information shared with it is not confidential. Any information shared with the office may be used in an ongoing investigation, or be used to begin a new one (if information about Prohibited Conduct is shared during a meeting).
 
The Title IX Office will maintain as confidential any interim or protective measures provided to the parties, to the extent such confidentiality does not impair the Title IX Office’s ability to provide the interim or protective measures. In some cases, the Title IX Office may need to disclose some information about an impacted party to a third party to provide necessary accommodations or protective measures.
 
For confidential resources, see CARE, CAPS, ASAP, or the Ombuds. 
 
What happens to the report? Making a report does not necessarily start an investigation. Reports will be archived to establish a permanent record, in case the alleged perpetrator is the subject of repeated allegations.
 

Other Interpersonal Conflicts

We encourage you to start with any trusted member of the department, such as the Department Chair, Graduate Advisor, Graduate and Undergraduate Program Coordinators, or Diversity Advocates, whether in person, email, or through the suggestions and reports form (which can provide you with complete anonymity). If you prefer to seek counsel from outside the Department, the Ombuds office provides confidential resources for problem and complaint resolution, including but not limited to employment-related issues, ADA complaints and disability accommodations, grievances related to coursework, and advisor-advisee or other interpersonal conflicts. Graduate Students may want to consult with Ryan Sims, Academic Counselor at the Graduate Division.